Dengue Fever Outbreak, Illinois Reports 27 Cases, CDC Sounds Alarm

Estimated read time 4 min read

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has warned about dengue in the U.S. after seeing record-breaking dengue cases in most of the Americas. Currently, Illinois has reported 27 cases, with a significant 17 being Cook County residents. The surge has impacted a total of 745 U.S travelers so far this year.

 

Illinois Case Summary

  • Champaign County records, between 1-4 cases
  • Ogle County records, between 1-4 cases
  • Will County records, between 1-4 cases
  • Cook County, 17 cases

 

New Highs for Dengue in the Americas

In the CDC’s warning issued on June 25, over 9.7 million dengue cases were reported across America’s countries which is more than double the figure of 4.6 million reported throughout 2023. Dengue fever is caused by one of four closely related viruses and is spread via Aedes mosquito bites.

 

About Dengue Fever

An infection provides protection against that specific virus while immunity to other dengue viruses lasts few months up to few years. Approximately one in four infections are symptomatic with symptoms usually appearing between three to ten days after infection.

Symptoms include:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Muscle aches
  • Rashes
  • Joint and bone pain
  • Pain behind your eyes,
  • Headache and low white blood cell count.

 

Checking and Dealing with Illness

At present those showing symptoms can be tested using molecular and serologic diagnostic tests as provided by local public health departments. People take supportive treatments primarily since no antiviral treatments have been approved for dengue as yet. The best care involves triage, management and follow-up.

 

CDC Warning and Advice

The CDC stresses that Aedes mosquitoes can spread viruses like dengue, Zika, and chikungunya. Yearly, up to 400 million people are infected with these four dengue viruses causing roughly 100 million people to fall sick. Severe cases can result in near about 40,000 deaths annually.

Current Illinois Data

By July 2 all recorded dengue cases in Illinois involved travelers. No local transmission has been found. The travelers hail from four different Illinois counties,

In Cook County there are 17 cases, In Champaign County there between 1-4 cases, Ogle County has between 1-4 cases, Will County records between 1-4 cases.

Dengue Background Information

Dengue fever is common in six U.S territories, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the U.S Virgin Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshal Islands and the Republic of Palau in the continental US, confirmed outbreaks have been sporadic or small scale in areas including Florida, Hawaii, Texas, California and Arizona over the last couple years.

Responding Globally and Locally

Following surges in Dengue numbers, the CDC is operating an emergency response which involves regular updates on situation strengthening labor capacity along with guidance for dengue surveillance and prevention methods. Additionally public education on Dengue prevention forms an integral part of this response.

 

Prevention Tips for Public

  • Use EPA approved repellents if you’re travelling where dengue transmission is frequent or continuous
  • Wear loose long-sleeved pants or shirts
  • Reduce mosquito breeding sites by dumping drain containers holding water
  • Install screens on windows or air conditioners
  • Go for medical care if you’re unwell following travel to a dengue hotspot

Healthcare Provider Recommendations

Maintain suspicion of dengue among patients with fever and recent travel to areas where dengue transmission is frequent. Order FDA approved Dengue tests but don’t delay in treatment while waiting for test results. From the beginning of fever decline, some patients might deteriorate quickly without proper fluid management so recognizing early phase of symptoms is necessary that can last 24–48 hours.

Final Words

Rise in cases indicates need for awareness and preventive measures against dengue. While the CDC think risk of widespread national issue is, however, low situation in Illinois with 27 cases reported Stress indicates cruciality of timely medical care, vigilant public health efforts and community awareness.

Celina Brooks https://www.southcountymail.com

Celina Brooks from Mussoorie is a Writer & Researcher. She earned her Engineering degree in IT from Rutgers University. She is a technology enthusiast but loves writing and talking about local news as well. She is a jolly person with 2 children.

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